Contemplating Madness

Mathematics and stuff

273,331 notes

pizzaforpresident:

I went to a party once and everyone was supposed to pitch in some money to buy adderall. I had never tried or even heard of it but I was young and stupid so I gave them 20 bucks. Later on, after we all took it, everybody was going crazy and having a good time and I was just sitting on the couch quietly so I googled ‘adderall’ on my phone and learned that it’s used to treat ADHD.

I have ADHD.

I paid 20 dollars to calm down.

(Source: rhyse, via speakerinnabeaker)

8,953 notes

A researcher tells the following story about her own experience of discovering the seriousness with which young children take gender stereotypes. While interviewing 3 to 6 year olds about their career aspirations, she asked each of them what they would want to be when they grew up if they were members of the opposite sex. Their responses showed that not only did most of the children choose careers that fit the stereotypes of the other gender but also that their perceptions of the limitations imposed by gender were sometimes quite extreme. One little girl confided with a sigh that her true ambition was to fly like a bird, but she could never do it because she was not a boy! One little boy put his hands on his head, sighed deeply, and said helplessly that if he were a girl he would have to grow up and be nothing (Beuf, 1974 as cited by Lips, 2008, p. 401).

holy fucking shit i just

that last line

(via ireandmaliss)

(via thevalidfallacy)

420,205 notes

unrepentantwarriorpriest:

retardablefoxes:

spirituallyrecovering:

year-0f-the-kyle:

It never has.

This is a concept most of tumblr can’t wrap their head around.

i’ll reblog this every single time i see it

We all should. Let’s make this thing go viral. 

Signal Boost.

Yeah, but that doesn’t mean it’s not understandable. Coming to hate your oppressor, or if you want to be technical “the people who tend to be your oppressor”, is understandable.

So, sure hate might not end abuse or oppression, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a legitimate feeling.

(Source: , via bloodredorion)

Filed under heterophobia is especially understandable groups of straight men are terrifying and I'm a cis hetero white man if I was part of a group in which more violence is perpetuated against I cant even imagine

20,777 notes

letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

letterstomycountry:

Via A Mighty Girl:

Professional hacker Parisa Tabriz is responsible for keeping the nearly billion users of Google Chrome safe by finding vulnerabilities in their system before malicious hackers do. Tabriz, a “white hat” hacker who calls herself Google’s “Security Princess”, is head of the company’s information security engineering team. The 31-year-old Polish-Iranian-American is also an anomaly in Silicon Valley according to a recent profile in The Telegraph: “Not only is she a woman – a gender hugely under-represented in the booming tech industry – but she is a boss heading up a mostly male team of 30 experts in the US and Europe.”

Tabriz came up with “Security Princess” while at a conference and the unusual title is printed on her business card. “I knew I’d have to hand out my card and I thought Information Security Engineer sounded so boring,” she says. “Guys in the industry all take it so seriously, so security princess felt suitably whimsical.” Her curiosity, mischievousness, and innovative thinking are all assets in her business: a high-profile company like Google is constantly in the crosshairs of so-called “black hat” hackers.

Tabriz came into internet security almost by accident; at the University of Illinois’ computer engineering program, her interest was first whetted by the story of early hacker John Draper, who became known as Captain Crunch in the 1960s after he learned how to make free long-distance calls using a toy whistle from a Cap’n Crunch cereal box. She realized that, to beat the hackers of today, she had to be prepared for similar — but more advanced — out-of-the-box thinking.

While women at still very under-represented in the tech industry — Google recently reported that only 30% of its staff is female — Tabriz has hope for the future: “[F]ifty years ago there were similar percentages of women in medicine and law, now thankfully that’s shifted.” And, while she hasn’t encountered overt sexism at Google, when she was offered the position, at least one classmate said, “you know you only got it cos you’re a girl.” To help address this imbalance, she mentors under-16 students at a yearly computer science conference that teaches kids how to “hack for good” — and she especially encourages girls to pursue internet security work. One 16-year-old who attended, Trinity Nordstrom, says, “Parisa is a good role model, because of her I’d like to be a hacker.”

Tabriz, who was named by Forbes as one of the “top 30 under 30 to watch” in 2012, also wants the public to realize that hacking can be used for positive ends. “[H]acking can be ugly,” she says. “The guy who published the private photos of those celebrities online made headlines everywhere. What he did was not only a violation of these women but it was criminal, and as a hacker I was very saddened by it. I feel like we, the hackers, need better PR to show we’re not all like that… [A]fter all I’m in the business of protecting people.”

To read more about Google’s “Security Princess” in The Telegraph, visit http://bit.ly/Z6Z5RG

(via papercogs)

94 notes

sagansense:

Study: DNA Strand Length Is Indicator Of Your Life SpanAccording to a team of geneticists, the longer a person’s telomeres (the protective ends of chromosomes) the longer they will live — at least, that’s the case among a group of heart disease patients studied. The announcement was made by Salt Lake City’s Intermountain Heart Institute, at the American College of Cardiology’s Annual Scientific Session.
“Our research shows that if we statistically adjust for age, patients with longer telomeres live longer, suggesting that telomere length is more than just a measure of age, but may also indicate the probability for survival,” said John Carlquist, director of the institute’s genetics lab. “Longer telomere length directly correlate with the likelihood for a longer life — even for patients with heart disease.”
Telomeres prevent information contained at the ends of chromosomes from being lost, and other chromosomes from fusing to those ends. However, each time our cells divide these telomeres shorten, rendering them weaker as we age and making us more susceptible to age-related diseases as time goes on. Their length has therefore long been associated with the ageing process and estimating age, but studies focusing on how we can use their length as indicators of life expectancy have largely been reserved to animal studies for obvious reasons — we won’t know if estimates are right until the owner dies.
To get round this a team of geneticists studied telomeres in zebra finches at 25 days and then at various stages throughout their lives (which range from one to nine years, on average). The study revealed that finches with the longest telomeres (consistently, throughout their life span) lived longer. Most recently, the first project to study telomeres across the entire life span of a species in the wild (Seychelles Warblers) also found that telomere length directly correlated to life span. “We investigated whether, at any given age, their telomere lengths could predict imminent death,” said David Richardson of the University of East Anglia, lead author on the paper. “We found that short and rapidly shortening telomeres were a good indication that the bird would die within a year. We also found that individuals with longer telomeres had longer life spans overall.”
Subjects in this latest human study were all heart attack or stroke patients, not exactly representative of a cross section of society but with more than 3,500 individuals investigated it reveals an important indicator that could be replicable. This was only possible after drawing on 20 years’ worth of medical and survival records, including DNA samples (the centre has these on file for nearly 30,000 heart patients, making it a veritable encyclopedia of information on the genetics of heart disease).
“It’s unmatched in the world,” Carlquist said, boasting about the records system, “and it allows us to measure the rate of change in the length of a patient’s telomeres over time rather than just a snapshot in time, which is typical for most studies.”
Carlquist hopes the find will be used to measure the effectiveness of heart care treatment in the future, with clinicians monitoring telomere length intermittently — a no doubt costly but potentially highly effective route of monitoring patient progress and well being.
image: Shutterstock

sagansense:

Study: DNA Strand Length Is Indicator Of Your Life Span

According to a team of geneticists, the longer a person’s telomeres (the protective ends of chromosomes) the longer they will live — at least, that’s the case among a group of heart disease patients studied.

The announcement was made by Salt Lake City’s Intermountain Heart Institute, at the American College of Cardiology’s Annual Scientific Session.

“Our research shows that if we statistically adjust for age, patients with longer telomeres live longer, suggesting that telomere length is more than just a measure of age, but may also indicate the probability for survival,” said John Carlquist, director of the institute’s genetics lab. “Longer telomere length directly correlate with the likelihood for a longer life — even for patients with heart disease.”

Telomeres prevent information contained at the ends of chromosomes from being lost, and other chromosomes from fusing to those ends. However, each time our cells divide these telomeres shorten, rendering them weaker as we age and making us more susceptible to age-related diseases as time goes on. Their length has therefore long been associated with the ageing process and estimating age, but studies focusing on how we can use their length as indicators of life expectancy have largely been reserved to animal studies for obvious reasons — we won’t know if estimates are right until the owner dies.

To get round this a team of geneticists studied telomeres in zebra finches at 25 days and then at various stages throughout their lives (which range from one to nine years, on average). The study revealed that finches with the longest telomeres (consistently, throughout their life span) lived longer. Most recently, the first project to study telomeres across the entire life span of a species in the wild (Seychelles Warblers) also found that telomere length directly correlated to life span. “We investigated whether, at any given age, their telomere lengths could predict imminent death,” said David Richardson of the University of East Anglia, lead author on the paper. “We found that short and rapidly shortening telomeres were a good indication that the bird would die within a year. We also found that individuals with longer telomeres had longer life spans overall.”

Subjects in this latest human study were all heart attack or stroke patients, not exactly representative of a cross section of society but with more than 3,500 individuals investigated it reveals an important indicator that could be replicable. This was only possible after drawing on 20 years’ worth of medical and survival records, including DNA samples (the centre has these on file for nearly 30,000 heart patients, making it a veritable encyclopedia of information on the genetics of heart disease).

“It’s unmatched in the world,” Carlquist said, boasting about the records system, “and it allows us to measure the rate of change in the length of a patient’s telomeres over time rather than just a snapshot in time, which is typical for most studies.”

Carlquist hopes the find will be used to measure the effectiveness of heart care treatment in the future, with clinicians monitoring telomere length intermittently — a no doubt costly but potentially highly effective route of monitoring patient progress and well being.

image: Shutterstock

(via stormbear)