Contemplating Madness

Mathematics and stuff

17,480 notes

chaniall:

people shit on math and science because they’re not good at it y’all are like “being amazing at math and science doesn’t make you intelligent” nah man it literally does it’s just that if you aren’t amazing at math and science it doesn’t mean you’re unintelligent don’t shit on other people’s talents simply because they aren’t yours

(via thebermudalocket)

5 notes

bloodredorion:

The symbolic logic used in mathematics or…? For which class?

I don’t know… All of them? I know that the thing that looks like an R means ’ real numbers’, but I don’t really know what the thing that looks like a rounded E means… Etc…

Oh, so Set Theory notation? 

http://www.rapidtables.com/math/symbols/Set_Symbols.htm

If you just need all of it, you should be able to find everything here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_mathematical_symbols

192 notes

I remember always being baffled by other children. I would be at a birthday party and watch the other kids giggling and making faces, and I would try to do that, too, but I wouldn’t understand why. I would sit there with the tight elastic thread of the birthday hat parting the pudge of my underchin, with the grainy frosting of the cake bluing my teeth, and I would try to figure out why it was fun.
Gillian Flynn, Gone Girl (via simply-quotes)

(Source: simply-quotes, via ab-sences)

10,338 notes

Depression is humiliating. It turns intelligent, kind people into zombies who can’t wash a dish or change their socks. It affects the ability to think clearly, to feel anything, to ascribe value to your children, your lifelong passions, your relative good fortune. It scoops out your normal healthy ability to cope with bad days and bad news, and replaces it with an unrecognizable sludge that finds no pleasure, no delight, no point in anything outside of bed. You alienate your friends because you can’t comport yourself socially, you risk your job because you can’t concentrate, you live in moderate squalor because you have no energy to stand up, let alone take out the garbage. You become pathetic and you know it. And you have no capacity to stop the downward plunge. You have no perspective, no emotional reserves, no faith that it will get better. So you feel guilty and ashamed of your inability to deal with life like a regular human, which exacerbates the depression and the isolation.
Depression is humiliating.
If you’ve never been depressed, thank your lucky stars and back off the folks who take a pill so they can make eye contact with the grocery store cashier. No one on earth would choose the nightmare of depression over an averagely turbulent normal life.
It’s not an incapacity to cope with day to day living in the modern world. It’s an incapacity to function. At all. If you and your loved ones have been spared, every blessing to you. If depression has taken root in you or your loved ones, every blessing to you, too.
Depression is humiliating.
No one chooses it. No one deserves it. It runs in families, it ruins families. You cannot imagine what it takes to feign normalcy, to show up to work, to make a dentist appointment, to pay bills, to walk your dog, to return library books on time, to keep enough toilet paper on hand, when you are exerting most of your capacity on trying not to kill yourself. Depression is real. Just because you’ve never had it doesn’t make it imaginary. Compassion is also real. And a depressed person may cling desperately to it until they are out of the woods and they may remember your compassion for the rest of their lives as a force greater than their depression. Have a heart. Judge not lest ye be judged.
Pearl (via psych2go)

(Source: psych-facts, via ab-sences)

739 notes

Hypervigilance sounds innocuous, but it is in fact exhaustingly distressing, a conditioned response to life-threatening situations. Imagine there’s a murderer in your house. And it is dark outside, and the electricity is out. Imagine your nervous system spiking, readying you as you feel your way along the walls, the sensitivity of your hearing, the tautness in your muscles, the alertness shooting around inside your skull. And then imagine feeling like that all the time.
Mac McClelland, Is PTSD contagious? (via disabledbyculture)

(Source: Mother Jones, via seeingmagnificence)

Filed under That more or less hits the nail on the head

2,045 notes

President Obama signs $8.7 billion food stamp cut into law

thebluelip-blondie:

babybutta:

whitegirlsaintshit:

what the fuck

Okay but you know I really don’t fuck with him like at all anymore. Cause nigga while you cutting $90 worth of food from poor family’s you still able to eat $1500 meals.

fuck obama

(Source: voidlesscreams, via logicianmagician)

1,729 notes

I love science, and it pains me to think that so many are terrified of the subject or feel that choosing science means you cannot also choose compassion, or the arts, or be awed by nature. Science is not meant to cure us of mystery, but to reinvent and reinvigorate it.
Robert M. Sapolsky (via pridejoyetc)

(Source: utcjonesobservatory, via fuckyeahneuroscience)

61,725 notes

I told Miyazaki I love the “gratuitous motion” in his films; instead of every movement being dictated by the story, sometimes people will just sit for a moment, or they will sigh, or look in a running stream, or do something extra, not to advance the story but only to give the sense of time and place and who they are.

"We have a word for that in Japanese," he said. "It’s called ma. Emptiness. It’s there intentionally.”

Is that like the “pillow words” that separate phrases in Japanese poetry?

"I don’t think it’s like the pillow word." He clapped his hands three or four times. "The time in between my clapping is ma. If you just have non-stop action with no breathing space at all, it’s just busyness. But if you take a moment, then the tension building in the film can grow into a wider dimension. If you just have constant tension at 80 degrees all the time you just get numb.

Rogert Ebert, on Hayao Miyazaki (via skeletales)

(Source: improv-is-easy, via papercogs)

23 notes

My son came out onto the balcony, hummed and flapped his arms, then giggled and went back in.

Some would have you believe that isn’t a valid and valuable method of communication. They are wrong.

I understood his joy, his relief that the teachers and students at his new school seem nice, and his excitement to go back tomorrow.

That was a great talk.

Angie Jackson (via misandryangie)

(via cunafish)